Sour Diesel

Taste Profile

Sativa
Indica
THC
CBD

Flavour

This Session Garden strain guide article provides crowd sourced information about the Sour Diesel strain including the origins, THC content, appearance, effects & more.

Sour Diesel (sometimes referred to as “Sour D”) is a popular Sativa-dominant strain of cannabis. Though it was originally produced in New York City, it can now be found throughout North America and parts of Europe. Known for its strong aroma and energizing experiences, Sour Diesel is common among both recreational and medical users, though it is especially popular among the latter. Sour Diesel has been reported to help relieve physical pain, depression, and anxiety, while simultaneously boosting energy and creativity.

What is the Origin of the Sour Diesel Strain?

Sour Diesel originated in the United States, likely in New York City. Though the exact timeline remains a mystery, cannabis experts speculate that people have been growing Sour Diesel for well over two decades.  In any case, Sour Diesel did not emerge as a popular strain throughout North America and Europe until the early to mid-2000s. Since legalization in parts of the United States and Canada, Sour Diesel has become one of the most prized and popular strains in all of North America.

The Lineage Of Sour Diesel

While Sour Diesel’s precise lineage is uncertain, it is likely descendant of Chemdog 91 and Super Skunk. Most Chemdog strains tend to be more Sativa-dominant, though there are a lot of variations that have qualities more associated with Indicas. Alternatively, Super Skunk is an Indica-dominant variation of the original Skunk strain. Sour Diesel gets its flavour, scent, and strength from both of these popular strains. Additionally, Sour Diesel has spawned its own hybrid variations, including Diesel Duff and Champagne Diesel, both of which retain the distinctive scent and flavour of other Diesel-based strains.

Sour Diesel History

No one knows exactly when and how Sour Diesel was created. That said, many speculate that an expert grower known only as “AJ” developed Sour Diesel in New York City sometime in the early 1990s. From there, the popular hybrid spread down the East Coast and across the United States, eventually landing in California in the mid-1990s.

Like many strains developed before legalization, the exact nature of Sour Diesel’s development is shrouded in mystery. Even its genetics are not entirely clear, with some claiming that it was the result of combining Original Diesel with an unknown strain containing a variation of Skunk and Northern Lights. Regardless, Sour Diesel is one of the most sought-after strains in the United States today. It is especially popular on the East Coast.

How Is The Sour Diesel Strain Grown?

Luckily for growers, Sour Diesel is not overly complicated or high-maintenance strain. Sour Diesel plants flourish in temperate climates, with temperatures between 20-30 degrees Celsius. Like most strains, Sour Diesel cannot tolerate cold temperatures for long, so it is generally best to grow indoors. Nonetheless, Sour Diesel can be cultivated in both indoor and outdoor environments. Despite its versatility, the slow-growing cycle of Sour Diesel makes it less productive than some other strains, as it can take between 10-12 weeks to flower when grown outdoors. That said, indoor cultivation may speed up the flowering time by 1-2 weeks.

Sour Diesel Cultivation Details:

Flowering Time

10 – 12 weeks

Seed Sex

Feminized

Yield

~600 grams/plant

Where it grows?

Indoor/Outdoor

Physical Traits of the Sour Diesel Strain

Sour Diesel is a relatively tall strain, with most plants standing more than 2 meters tall. In addition to their height, Sour Diesel plants are also notable for their distinctive leaves and buds.

What Does Sour Diesel Look Like?

The leaves often have a yellow-green hue and are packed tightly together. The buds are average-sized, with long red or orange hairs that help catch pollen. Trichomes are usually found on the inside of the buds, while the exterior is relatively sticky.

What Aroma Does Sour Diesel Have?

Though Sour Diesel certainly has a distinctive look, it is the aroma (for which it is named) that stands out. Like all Diesel strains, Sour Diesel has a pungent, gasoline-like aroma. The scent is even stronger when the buds are broken up.

What flavors can you expect from Sour Diesel?

The name pretty much sums up the flavour: “Sour Diesel.” The taste of Sour Diesel is very similar to its aroma, which may not appeal to some people. Users report a gasoline-like flavour, with sour, skunky undertones. Upon exhalation, Sour Diesel has a somewhat earthy flavour, though it still retains its underlying flavour of sour gas. While the scent and flavour are certainly divisive among users, many people enjoy Sour Diesel’s distinct flavours. For those who choose their strain based on flavour alone, Sour Diesel can be a popular choice, as its smell and flavour are so overpowering.  In short, Sour Diesel has a very distinctive flavour and recognizable flavour, which often enhances the experience, but it still may not be to everyone’s tastes.

What Effects can you expect from Sour Diesel?

While Sour Diesel can have various effects on different people, it is well-known for producing a euphoric, energizing experience. It produces a very cerebral high, which is often described as both “dreamy” and “relaxing.” Thanks to its fast-acting pain relief, euphoria, and stress reduction, Sour Diesel is a favorite among medical cannabis users, though it is equally popular among recreational users.

However, there’s a lot more to Sour Diesel than euphoria and relaxation. The following are just a few of its most common effects:

  • Euphoria – While feelings of euphoria are pretty common among all strains of cannabis, they are particularly strong with Sour Diesel. Due to its high levels of THC, Sour Diesel produces strong cerebral effects that elevate mood and energy levels. This is why it is often prescribed to treat depression.
  • Energy Level – Users generally report high levels of energy when using the Sour Diesel strain. Sour Diesel rarely has sedative effects, so it can be consumed at just about any time of day without the risk of getting drowsy. It does make users more relaxed, but the mood-elevating effects generally lift energy levels as well.
  • Creativity – Many users will have creative thoughts and ideas with Sour Diesel. The reduction of anxiety allows for thoughts to flow more freely, while higher energy levels generate better productivity.
  • Sensitivity – Sensations are amplified, so listening to music or watching movies can be much more enjoyable. Additionally, since Sour Diesel does produce a mild body high, physical sensations are more pleasurable.
  • Relaxation – Even though Sour Diesel boosts energy levels, it also helps alleviate anxiety. The euphoric effects combine with increased energy to help users destress and enjoy the experience. That said, like most strains that are high in THC, Sour Diesel can cause paranoia in higher doses, so users should be careful with the dosage when using Sour Diesel.
  • Pain Relief – While Sour Diesel does not have high CBD levels, it is a good choice for aiding with pain relief. The body high produced by Sour Diesel is mild, but when combined with the euphoric cerebral high, it produces a numbing and relieving sensation throughout the entire body.

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